King Charles takes sole ownership of the Queen’s beloved racehorses

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King Charles III is to have his first runner after taking sole ownership of the Queen’s beloved horses following her passing earlier this month.

It was reported that Camilla was set to take over the reins from Queen Elizabeth II but it is Charles that will take on the huge racing operation.

Educator will be the first runner for the new King in the royal silks on Thursday after the three-year-old was declared to compete at Salisbury.

William Haggas, who trains Educator, attended the Queen’s more intimate funeral service at Windsor, along with fellow royal trainers Sir Michael Stoute, Michael Bell, and Roger Charlton.

Tom Marquand, who is the husband of fellow jockey Hollie Doyle, has been given the nod for the historic ride.

Educator, who will run in the Radliffe & Co handicap at Salisbury, is now listed as being owned by ‘The King’ on the British Horseracing Authority website, and has won his past two races.

King Charles has inherited the Queen's racing operation following her death on September 8

King Charles has inherited the Queen’s huge racing operation and will have his first runner on Thursday

Three-year-old colt Educator, pictured here dressed in the Queen's iconic purple, gold and red silks during the during the Henry Cecil Open earlier this month, has been declared to race at Salisbury on Thursday

Three-year-old colt Educator, pictured here dressed in the Queen’s iconic purple, gold and red silks during the during the Henry Cecil Open earlier this month, has been declared to race at Salisbury on Thursday

Under King Charles' old title of Prince of Wales, his own racehorses ran in red silks with blue sleeves and a dark navy cap

Under King Charles’ old title of Prince of Wales, his own racehorses ran in red silks with blue sleeves and a dark navy cap

It has not yet been confirmed if Educator will run in the late Queen’s colours.

Under King Charles’ old title of Prince of Wales, his own racehorses ran in red silks with blue sleeves and a dark navy cap.

Charles now inherits the Sovereign’s racing colours: purple body with gold braid, scarlet sleeves and black velvet cap with gold trim, which the Queen took on from the late King George V.

The King inherits about 24 racehorses and some 80 brood mares. The Princess Royal and Zara Tindall may wish to have first pickings but their main interest is eventing horses and not racehorses.

As heir to the Throne, the King was always aware the ownership and breeding of thoroughbreds was an expensive undertaking and was wary of committing himself to a large investment in the sport.

King Charles (centre) pictured at Royal Ascot in June alongside Camilla the Queen Consort with trainer Charlie Appleby (left)

King Charles (centre) pictured at Royal Ascot in June alongside Camilla the Queen Consort with trainer Charlie Appleby (left)

The King and Queen Consort inherits about 24 racehorses and some 80 brood mares

The King and Queen Consort inherits about 24 racehorses and some 80 brood mares

King Charles' interest in the sport of racing to date has been ‘a slow burn’, according to the late Queen’s racing manager, John Warren

King Charles’ interest in the sport of racing to date has been ‘a slow burn’, according to the late Queen’s racing manager, John Warren

His mother had in recent years encouraged him to take a greater interest in her hobby. John Warren, the late Queen’s racing manager, has said the King’s interest in the sport to date has been ‘a slow burn’.

Before the King’s accession to the throne he said: ‘Prince Charles has always followed it, but it has been his mother’s interest so it has been at arm’s length. He owns a few horses himself, in particular with the Duchess of Cornwall. She is absolutely besotted by racing.’

Her Majesty was notable for her passion for horse racing, owning and breeding hundreds of horses over her storied life and involvement in the sport.

 

The late Queen’s love of horses and ponies was passionate and enduring. On her fourth birthday she was given her first pony, a Shetland named Peggy, from her grandfather George V, and by the age of six was able to ride and control her.

She became so knowledgeable that it is said she could gauge the going on a particular race day at Ascot by listening to the sound of the hooves of her landau horses as they hit the ground.

The Queen, pictured meeting lady amateur jockeys at Beverley, was racing's ultimate endorser

The Queen, pictured meeting lady amateur jockeys at Beverley, was racing’s ultimate endorser

The late Queen’s love of horses and ponies was passionate and enduring (Pictured on the grounds of Windsor Castle in May 1944)

The late Queen’s love of horses and ponies was passionate and enduring (Pictured on the grounds of Windsor Castle in May 1944)

For years members of her family joked the only people who could easily reach her by phone were her racing managers. In an iconic image to mark her 96th birthday in April, the Queen was pictured with a huge smile holding the reins between two magnificent white fell ponies.

She had 1,600 winners, including victory in four of the five British Classic races. In 1957 Carrozza won the Oaks, in 1958 Pall Mall won the 2000 Guineas, in 1974 Highclere won the 1000 Guineas and in 1977 Dunfermline won the Oaks and St Leger. John Warren once remarked: ‘If the Queen were not the Queen, she would have made a wonderful trainer.’

Racing observed a period of two days mourning following her passing and observed a day of mourning on the day of her funeral, when all meetings were called off as a mark of respect.

Her Majesty with Frankie Dettori — who rode for her for 30 years — at Royal Ascot after his 2019 Gold Cup win on Stradivarius

Her Majesty with Frankie Dettori — who rode for her for 30 years — at Royal Ascot after his 2019 Gold Cup win on Stradivarius

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